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A DICTIONARY OF ENGLISH PHILOSOPHICAL TERMS
 

Francis Garden - 1878 - Table of contents

Diccionario filosófico
Voltaire.
Complete edition

Diccionario de Filosofía
Brief definition of the most important concepts of philosophy.

 

A Dictionary of English Philosophical Terms Francis Garden
 

Vocabulary of Philosophy, Psychological, Ethical, Metaphysical
William Fleming

Biografías y semblanzas Biographical references and lives of philosophers

Brief introduction to the thought of Ortega y Gasset

History of Philosophy Summaries

Historia de la Filosofía
Explanation of the thought of the great philosophers; summaries, exercises...

Historia de la Filosofía
Digital edition of the History of Philosophy by Jaime Balmes

Historia de la Filosofía
Digital edition of the History of Philosophy by Zeferino González

Vidas, opiniones y sentencias de los filósofos más ilustres
Complete digital edition of the work of Diogenes Laertius

Compendio de las vidas de los filósofos antiguos
Fénelon

A brief history of Greek Philosophy
B. C. Burt

 

A Short History of Philosophy

Alexander

 

 

Converse, Conversion

Converse, Conversion. Conversion in logic means the reversal of a proposition's polarity, so that what was the subject becomes the predicate, and vice versa. It is distinct from inversion as being a logical, whereas that is merely a rhetorical process. In inversion the subject and the predicate remain each what it was, but their usual places are changed, and this when the inversion is natural and justifiable gives emphasis, especially to the predicate.

 

Thus it comes spontaneously in rhetorical or poetical utterance. Thus "few, few shall part where many meet." Here few is the predicate, but has great emphasis, not being in its natural position. The aim of conversion, on the other hand, is to present a judgment essentially one with that first arrived at, but in a different light, and is thus one of the forms of immediate inference, i. e. inference not requiring any aid from the discursive process, from the interposition of another judgment, as in syllogism.

 

 

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