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VOCABULARY OF PHILOSOPHY

PSYCHOLOGICAL, ETHICAL, METAPHYSICAL
 

WILLIAM FLEMING - 1890 - Table of contents

A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H- I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W  

Diccionario filosófico
Voltaire.
Complete edition

Diccionario de Filosofía
Brief definition of the most important concepts of philosophy.

 

A Dictionary of English Philosophical Terms Francis Garden

 

Vocabulary of Philosophy, Psychological, Ethical, Metaphysical
William Fleming

Biografías y semblanzas Biographical references and lives of philosophers

Brief introduction to the thought of Ortega y Gasset

History of Philosophy Summaries

Historia de la Filosofía
Explanation of the thought of the great philosophers; summaries, exercises...

Historia de la Filosofía
Digital edition of the History of Philosophy by Jaime Balmes

Historia de la Filosofía
Digital edition of the History of Philosophy by Zeferino González

Vidas, opiniones y sentencias de los filósofos más ilustres
Complete digital edition of the work of Diogenes Laertius

Compendio de las vidas de los filósofos antiguos
Fénelon

A brief history of Greek Philosophy
B. C. Burt

 

A Short History of Philosophy

Alexander

 

 

vocabulary of philosophy - william fleming

DÆMON | DARWINIAN THEORY—DARWINISM.— V. EVOLUTION | DATUM | DEDUCTION | DE FACTO and DE JURE | DEFINITION | DEIST | DEMERIT.—V. MERIT | DEMIURGE | DEMONSTRATION | DEONTOLOGY | DESCENT.—V. EVOLUTION | DESCRIPTION | DESERT.— V. MERIT | DESIGN | DESIRE | DESTINY | DETERMINISM | DETERRENT.— V. PUNISHMENT | DEVELOPMENT.— V. EVOLUTION | DIALECTIC | DICHOTOMY | DICTUM DE OMNI ET NULLO | DICTUM SIMPLICITER | DIFFERENCE | DIFFERENTIATION | DILEMMA | DISCURSIVE | DISJUNCTIVE | DISPOSITION | DISSOLUTION | DISTANCE | DISTINCT | DISTINCTION | DISTRIBUTION | DISTRIBUTIVE (Justice).— V. JUSTICE | DIVISION | DOGMA | DOGMATISM | DOUBT | DREAMING | DUALISM | DUALITY of CONSCIOUSNESS | DURATION | DUTY | DYNAMIC | DYNAMICAL

 

DÆMON
 

 

DÆMON (δαίμων or δαιμόνιον).—The term (1) in earliest usage meant a god, one of the order of deities; (2) later, an inferior deity, acting the part of a messenger for the gods, specially in communicating their will to men; this is the sense in which it is applied to the dæmon or genius of Socrates; (3) in latest use, an evil spirit.

Socrates declared that he had a friendly spirit, or Dæmon, who restrained him from things he was about to do.

"He is a great spirit (δαίμων), and like all that is spiritual he is intermediate between the divine and the mortal." "And what is the nature of this spiritual power?" Socrates said. "This is the power," Diotima said, "which interprets and conveys to the gods the prayers and sacrifices of men, and to men the commands and rewards of the gods; and this power spans the chasm which divides them, and in this all is bound together" (Plato's Symposium, 202, Jowett).

In his Apology, Socrates refers to the coming of the δαιμόνιον as a well-known characteristic of his life, inconsistent with the charge of atheism brought against him. The Daimonion is spoken of as a Voice, a God, and a Messenger from the God.

Plutarch has a Dialogue on the Dæmon of Socrates, and Apuleius also wrote De Deo Socratis (Ueberweg's Hist., I. 236).


 

 

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